Confusing guest

The main door, from which he saw the first glimpse of the interior, was quite beautifully carved into metrological patterns, and similarly decorated inside the walls, though as he moved from room to room he also saw images of animals, birds, and people taking their place in decorative design. Stone vessels were much on display, as were gold jewelery and the hooves of many animals, but no sign of any tissue products was visible, so the Hondons were still at a low step on the scale of development, at least in that respect, although the proportions and proportions of corridors and rooms were quite civilized.

They stepped through several sheltered and long corridors, up at least three stone steps and finally out onto the blue lake side to the embankment on the western edge of the building. Along this embankment, or pillared road, the guide led him about a hundred yards and stopped at the large main door that led to another palace apartment.

Here Tarzan saw quite a number of warriors in an extraordinarily spacious hall, whose dome law rose more than fifty feet from the main floor. The room was almost filled with a large pyramid, rising in wide steps near the dome, from the circular holes of which the hall received its illumination. The steps of the pyramid had warriors up to the top, on which sat a large and majestic man, as the evening sun shone from such a small opening its rays on his brilliantly glorious golden outfit.

“Ko-tan!” shouted Dak-lot, speaking of the glorious creature sitting atop the pyramid, “Warriors of Ko-tan and Pal-ul-don! Look at the glory Jad-ben-Otho has bestowed on you by sending his own son as his messenger,” and stepping to the side with a dramatic wave of his hand showed Tarzan.

Ko-tan stood up and each sighted warrior reached his neck better to look at the newcomer. Those on the opposite side of the pyramid invaded the front, with an old warrior’s message arriving at them. Expressions of disbelief were reflected on most faces, but it was a cautious disbelief. They wanted to be on the right side, no matter what. As a dart, everyone’s eyes were on Tarzan and then they gradually moved to Ko-tan, for from his tone they received a hint that dictated their own. But Ko-tan was apparently in the same trouble as they were – his body posture showed it, expressing indecision and doubt.

The monkey stood straight, arms crossed on a broad chest, a pretty face reflecting a lofty contempt; but Dak-lot was noticing signs of growing anger. The situation began to feel forced. Dak-lot moved, creating anxious glances at Tarzan and praying at Ko-tan. The silence of the tomb had taken over the throne of Pal-ul-don.

Finally, Ko-tan spoke. “Who says he’s Dor-ul-Otho?” he asked, casting a horrible look at Dak-lot.

“He says!” almost this alarmed superiority exclaimed.

“And so must it be true?” crocheted Ko-tan.

Could it have been possible that there was a slight iva in the master’s voice? Otho beware! Dak-lot created a sideline for Tarzan, which he meant to reflect the certainty of his own faith; but it succeeded in enlightening the ape man only with his pity of pity.

“O Ko-tan,” appealed to Dak-lot, “your own eyes must assure you that he is indeed the son of Othon. Look at his divine arm, his hands and feet, which are not like ours, and he is quite tailless as mighty even his father. ”

For the first time, Ko-tan seemed to notice these facts, and his disbelief seemed to falter. At that moment, among other things, his voice was raised by a young warrior who had cleared his way in front of the pyramid, from where he got a proper view of Tarzan.

“Ko-tan,” cried he, “there must be as Dak-lot says, for I am now confident that I’ve already seen before Dor-ul-Othon. Yesterday, when we were on the way back with the kur-ul-lulilaisten prisoners we saw him a great gryfin We hid in the woods before he came too licked, but I clearly saw that the rider was none other than the messenger standing here now. ”

This testimony seemed just enough to convince the majority of the warriors that they were indeed standing in front of a deity — their faces showed it all too clearly, as did the sudden sobering that led them to seek their fellow-partners. When they tried to do the same, the result was a sudden dwindling of the monkey man’s environment, until the steps of the pyramid directly in front of him were empty all the way to the top and to Ko-tan. The latter was perhaps as much affected by the fear of his people as the recent testimony, and he now changed his tone and posture as might be required if the stranger was indeed Dor-ul-Otho, still leaving a dwelling hole in his dignity in case he was seen to have taken the traitor. .

“If you really are Dor-ul-Otho,” he said, speaking to Tarzan, “then you know our suspicions were only natural when we have not received any sign from Jad-ben-Otho that he was going to give us such great honor, and how we could even know that the great God had a son? If you are him, then is the Joy of all Pal-ul-don to serve you, if you are not, then the punishment of your courage is quick and terrible. , I have spoken.”

“And spoken well, as will talk to the king,” said Tarzan intercept a lengthy silence, “who fears and respects the people of God. It is right you need to take care of that, I really am Dor-ul-Otho, before the swamps me worship according to my values. My first experience of you expressed that Jad-ben-Otho chose well when he blew the king’s spirit into the little one’s breast.

“- So it is good,” continued the ape, “you must make sure that I am not a traitor. Come closer, to discover that I am not like men. And otherwise it is not proper for you to stand higher than the son of your God.” The crowd suddenly crashed into the throne of the throne room, and Ko-tan was not far behind his warriors, though he was able to maintain some majestic dignity as he descended the wide stairs that had been shiny smooth for countless bare feet for many periods. “And now,” said the king of Tarzan as he stood before him, “you can have no doubt that I am not the same race as you. Your priests have told you that Jad-ben-Otho is tailless. Therefore, the tail must be of the gods that belong to him. race. But there has already been enough talk about such evidence! You know the power of Jad-ben-Othon; how his lightning flashes from heaven carry death according to his will; how the rains come at his command and the fruits and berries and grains, grass, trees, and flowers come to life by his divine ordinance; you have seen birth and death, and those who honor their God honor him for the reason that he rules these things. So how about a traitor claiming to be the son of this almighty god? But no testimony is needed, for as he would strike you on the ground, if you denied me, he would kill a man who would falsely declare himself a relative. ” how his lightning flashes from heaven carry death according to his will; how the rains come at his command and the fruits and berries and grains, grass, trees, and flowers come to life by his divine ordinance; you have seen birth and death, and those who honor their God honor him for the reason that he rules these things. So how about a traitor claiming to be the son of this almighty god? But no testimony is needed, for as he would strike you on the ground, if you denied me, he would kill a man who would falsely declare himself a relative. ” how his lightning flashes from heaven carry death according to his will; how the rains come at his command and the fruits and berries and grains, grass, trees, and flowers come to life by his divine ordinance; you have seen birth and death, and those who honor their God honor him for the reason that he rules these things. So how about a traitor claiming to be the son of this almighty god? But no testimony is needed, for as he would strike you on the ground, if you denied me, he would kill a man who would falsely declare himself a relative. ” who honor their God honor him for the reason that he rules these things. So how about a traitor claiming to be the son of this almighty god? But no testimony is needed, for as he would strike you on the ground, if you denied me, he would kill a man who would falsely declare himself a relative. ” who honor their God honor him for the reason that he rules these things. So how about a traitor claiming to be the son of this almighty god? But no testimony is needed, for as he would strike you on the ground, if you denied me, he would kill a man who would falsely declare himself a relative. ”

There was no answer to this reasoning, so it must have been convincing. The newcomer’s allegations could not be examined wordlessly without acknowledging the person’s deficient belief in the omnipotence of Jad-ben-Otho. Ko-tan realized that he had received a deity as his guest, but was somehow puzzled about how this was to be treated properly. His conception of God had been very vague and hazy, though his God and devils were as personal as those of all primitive peoples. For the amusement of Jad-ben-Otho, he had assumed fervor, which he himself enjoyed, but free from all unpleasant after-effects. It occurred to him that Dor-ul-Otho would be greatly pleased to eat — to eat to the greatest extent all that Ko-tan liked best and that he had found most harmful; and the women of Ho-don also prepared the drink, soaking the barley in the fruit juice and adding to it various other ingredients which they themselves knew best. God, reasoned Ko-tan, could experience all that pleasure without a headache; but now, first of all, he had to think of the necessary demonstrations of respect and honor to be given to his immortal guest.

No one but the king’s foot had touched the surface of the top of the pyramid of the throne hall of A-Luri in all those forgotten eras during which the rulers of Pal-ul-don had ruled at its height. So what greater glory could Ko-tan offer Dor-ul-Otho than the place next to him? And so he exhorted Tarzan to rise to the top of the pyramid and take his place with its stone money. As they arrived at the throne closer to the holy height, Ko-tan apparently intended to continue his ascent to the throne, but Tarzan lowered the restraining hand to his arm.

“Let no man sit with the gods,” he warned, stepping upright to the top and taking possession of the throne. Embarrassed, Ko-tan could not hide his embarrassment, but fearing the wrath of the king of kings, he did not dare to exaggerate anything about his feelings.

“But,” added Tarzan, “God can give his faithful servant the honor of inviting him to sit beside him. Come, Ko-tan; thus I want to show you mercy in the name of Jad-ben-Otho.”

The ape-man by his method not only tried to arouse the fearful respect of Ko-tan, but also avoided making him still his secret enemy, for he did not know how great power the Hondon religion had over them; the whole of this field had been completely excluded from his hearing from the moment he had interrupted the religious controversy which had arisen between Taden and Om-at. He was therefore quick to notice the hint of Ko-tan’s apparent, albeit unspoken, resentment that he had to completely hand over his throne to his guest. Overall, however, the power had been satisfactory, as he could see from the warriors ’renewed manifestations of solemn reverence.

At Tarzan’s urging, the court’s case was resumed from where his income had stopped it. Disputes between the warriors had to be resolved mainly. Arriving was, among other things, standing on the seat closest to the throne; Tarzan then learned that the place had been reserved for the highest chiefs of the allied tribes who were subordinate to Ko-tan. The one who caught Tarzan’s attention was a large and upright warrior; his stout facial features resembled a lion. He challenged Ko-tan on an issue that was as old as any government and will remain unimpaired until humanity ceases to exist. It was about a border dispute with one of his neighbors.

The matter itself had no significant interest in Tarzan, but he was influenced by the speaker’s appearance, and when Ko-tan spoke to him as Ja-don, the monkey’s attention became permanent, for Ja-don was Taden’s father, although there seemed to be little chance of him having that knowledge. useful because he could not, without admitting the unfoundedness of his divinity, express to Ja-don his kind intervals with his son.

At the end of the public affair, Ko-tan pointed out that the son of Jad-ben-Otho must have wanted to attend a temple where religious expenditures included in the worship of the great god were provided. And so the king himself, accompanied by the warriors of his court, led the ape through the corridors of the palace towards the northern building group of the area.

The temple itself was really part of the palace and similar in design. There were several places of worship of various sizes, the purposes of which Tarzan could only guess. They were all oval, the longer diameter straight east-west, and there was always an altar at both the west and east ends. Each shelter was concave at the top of a small hill, and all were roofless. Each western altar was a single cubic stone, the upper surface of which was concave into an elongated basin. The eastern altars were of similar stone, but flat in shape, and in contrast to the altars at the other end of the ovals, the latter were always stained or painted reddish-brown, and Tarzan did not have to examine them closely to make sure that

Beneath these temple courtyards were corridors and rooms that stretched far into the municipal veins — the dim, gloomy vaults that Tarzan saw with a glimpse as he was led from place to place on a temple inspection trip. Ko-tan had sent heralds to announce the arrival of Jad-ben-Othon’s son, so that they were accompanied through the temple by a considerable procession of priests, whose special features seemed to be bizarre headdresses – sometimes horrible wood-carved faces perfectly concealing fitted beasts. Only the high priest did not have any such headdress. He was an old man, his cunning eyes were the slimmest, and his thin-lipped mouth expressed cruelty.

At first glance, Tarzan realized that this was the greatest danger of his plot, for he immediately saw that he and his demands aroused a sense of opposition in the man, and he also knew that of all Pal-ul-don citizens no doubt the high priest must have a real idea of ​​Jad-ben-Otho , so that he would look skeptically at the man who claimed to be the son of a fairytale god.

Whatever suspicion in his cunning mind, whistle, Lu-don, the high priest of A-Luri, did not openly oppose Tarzan’s right to use the title of Dor-ul-Otho, and perhaps he was arrested by the same suspicion that had initially restrained Ko-Tan and his warriors — it a doubt that is in the innermost harmony of the soul of all slanderers and is based on the fear that there may finally be a god. So at least for now, Lu-don remained in a safe position. However, Tarzan knew as well as if the man had uttered his most secret thoughts, that the high priest’s fervent desire was to tear the veil of his betrayal.

At the main door of the temple, Ko-tan had handed his guest a guide to Lu-don, and the latter now showed Tarzan the places in the temple he wanted to see him. He led the stranger to the great shelter where the sacrificial gifts were kept, given by the brother-in-command of Pal-ul-don and their convicts. They ranged from dried fruit to sturdy gold-forged vessels, so that the riches accumulated in its large main fence and its associated chambers and corridors amazed the eyes of even the man who held the secret of Opar’s treasure vault.

In the temple, smooth-faced black Waz-Don slaves moved back and forth by the Khodons on their patrol expeditions from the villages of their less civilized neighbors. As they ignored a frosted corridor lattice door, inside Tarza saw a large number of pithecanthropes of all ages and of both sexes, homons like waz-dons, most of whom crouched on a stone perm in positions of extreme depression, a few contemplating the absolutely hopelessness of the protected face.

“And who are these?” he asked Lu-don. That was the first question he asked the high priest when he came to the temple. And he immediately regretted that of his intelligence, for when Lu-don turned to him there was a look of suspicion on his face only thinly veiled.

“Who should know better than the son of Jad-ben-Othon?” he asked against.

“Dor-ul-Otho’s questions are not answered with impunity by other questions,” the monkey said grimly, “and it may be interesting for High Priest Lu-don to know that the blood of a false priest on the altar of his temple is not a disgusting sight to Jad-ben-Otho.”

Lu-don turned pale, and he answered Tarzan’s question. “They are the victims whose blood is to be refreshed on the eastern altars as the sun returns to your Father at the end of the day.”

“And who has told you,” Tarzan asked, “that Jad-ben-Otho is pleased with the slaughter of his people on his altars? What if you are mistaken?”

“Then there are countless thousands who died in vain,” Lu-don replied.

Ko-tan and the surrounding warriors and priests listened intently to this call. Even behind the lattice doors, some of the unfortunate had heard and risen to press on the cane, outside of which one was brought just before sunrise each day, never to return.

“Release them!” shouted Tarzan, waving his hand at the victims captured by cruel superstition, “for I can tell you in the name of Jad-ben-Otho that you are wrong!”