Life,  Tech

What Happens in the Brain When We Die: A Study of Near-Death Experiences

  Many people who have been near death or who have been brought back to life have had similar experiences: memories of memorable moments replaying in their minds, and possibly “out of body” experiences, where they feel like they are being watched from another part of the room. However, studies have found that not all people who survive near death experience flashbacks or “out-of-body” experiences.
  Many people who have been near death or who have been brought back to life have had similar experiences: memories of memorable moments replaying in their minds, and possibly “out of body” experiences, where they feel like they are being watched from another part of the room.
   A small study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences mapped the brain activity of four people at the time of death. They showed a sudden burst of brain activity after their hearts stopped beating, the results showed. The findings may explain how a person’s brain recalls conscious memories after their heart stops beating, the authors said.
  ”This suggests that people are identifying a marker of conscious awareness,” commented Sam Parnia, a pulmonary specialist at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York, who was not involved in the study.
  The brain may replay memorable events in the final moments
   Although death is medically defined as the moment when the heart stops beating irreversibly, recent research has shown that brain activity in many animals and humans can persist from seconds to hours after the heart stops beating. Hour. “It shows that our binary concept of life and death is old and outdated,” Parnia said.
  ”I was shocked to realize that we know so little about brain activity during death,” said senior author Jimo Borjigin, a neuroscientist at the University of Michigan. patient’s medical records.
   Doctors put EEG caps on these four patients. The EEG cap continuously monitors electrical signals on the surface of the patient’s brain before and after doctors remove the ventilator, during each patient’s last heartbeat measurement, and until all brain activity ceases.
  Seconds after the ventilator was taken off, the brains of two of the patients were suddenly lit up with high-frequency neuronal activity called gamma waves. This activity continues until the heart stops beating.
   Ajmal Zemmar, a neurosurgeon at the University of Louisville in the United States, said: “Seeing gamma waves in people who are dying indicates that there is a biological mechanism for the brain to replay memorable events in the last moments.” Bursts of brain activity are a survival mode. For the
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   Only two people in the study showed gamma wave activity, and Charlotte Martial, a biomedical scientist at the University of Liege in Belgium, isn’t surprised, because he says not all people who survive near-death experience flashbacks or “out-of-body” experiences .
   Borjigin noted that two of the people whose brains showed gamma wave activity had a history of seizures, which could have caused their brains to experience abnormal rhythms.
   The team also found increased activity in the temporoparietal-occipital junction in the patients’ brains. This area is thought to be associated with consciousness and is activated during dreams, seizures and “out-of-body” states.
   Borjigin believes that bursts of brain activity are a survival mode. Studies of brain-dead animals have found that after brain death, the organ begins to release a large number of signaling molecules and produce unusual brain wave patterns in an attempt to wake itself up.

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