Chinese rich are still keen to buy overseas vineyards

Despite the challenges of extreme weather in nature and the uncertainties of the global economy, viticulture is still a thriving industry. For Chinese real estate investors seeking to diversify their asset allocations, vineyards are still a priority in their investment list.

France has always been a hot spot in recent years. According to statistics from the Christie’s Winery Department, an investment advisory professional, Chinese investors have purchased a total of 175 Bordeaux wineries since 2010. Bairns, co-founder of Christie’s International Real Estate Bordeaux Winery Department, estimates that since 2010, his team has participated in about 15 transactions between mainland China or Hong Kong investors. According to him, these investors are divided into three categories: those who already own alcohol or hotel business, who seek to control the product chain; those who are aware of the huge demand for Chinese wine; who like wine and this lifestyle and want to diversify their assets in Europe. People.

Baines said: “This region has been welcoming investors and wine lovers for centuries. I am sure that this will continue for hundreds of years. I have no doubt that China will become an important player in the future.”

At the same time, China’s interest in another wine region in the world, Napa Valley, California, seems to be decreasing. Betolucci of Sotheby’s International Real Estate Company said, “Chinese buyers are not as strong as last year’s winery.” He added that buyers are not now looking to buy ready-made wineries, but rather interested in properties with small private wineries where they can grow grapes.

In Australia, the situation is different. In South Australia’s iconic Barossa Valley, 10% of the wineries are in the hands of the Chinese. Strachan, who is involved in the acquisition of the wine company, said that six of the seven transactions he handled earlier this year involved Chinese investors.