planets destroy

I wanted, before leaving Kyōto, to visit the tomb of Yuko Hatakeyama. After having vainly inquired of several persons where she was buried, it occurred to me to ask a Buddhist priest who had come to the hotel on some parochial business. He answered at once, “In the cemetery of Makkeiji.” Makkeiji was a temple not mentioned in guide-books, and situated somewhere at the outskirts of the city. I took…

OUT OF THE STREET

“These,” said Manyemon, putting on the table a roll of wonderfully written Japanese manuscript, “are Vulgar Songs. If they are to be spoken of in some honorable book, perhaps it will be good to say that they are Vulgar, so that Western people may not be deceived.” * Next to my house there is a vacant lot, where washermen _(sentukaya)_ work in the ancient manner,–singing as they work, and whipping…

A LIVING GOD

Of whatever dimension, the temples or shrines of pure Shintō are all built in the same archaic style. The typical shrine is a windowless oblong building of unpainted timber, with a very steep overhanging roof; the front is the gable end; and the upper part of the perpetually closed doors is wooden lattice-work,–usually a grating of bars closely set and crossing each other at right angles. In most cases the…

QUAKERTOWN

In the new century, ecclesiastical persecutions are scarcely more than a tradition, save to the aged men and women still living who took part in their youth in the great countermove, the sufferings attendant upon which are now, even to them, as a nightmare dream. The laws that nerved to heroic protest a people resolved to obey no dictation of man in regard to the worship of God lie dead…

The Quakers at Meeting

Mr. Hempstead, in his usual brief style of chronicle, gives no further light upon this matter. By the records of the County Court, in the following June, it is shown that the Quakers referred to in the Diary were John Bolles, his wife Sarah and John Waterhouse, and that the impelling reason for this countermove was because John Waterhouse had been seized and maltreated for baptizing Joseph Bolles, eldest son…

Here it may be well

We left John Rogers on his way back to prison, there to remain until the March term of the Superior Court, because he would not promise “good behavior” (“as if I had misbehaved myself.” Part I., Chapter V.). Against tyranny in high places, there is ever at hand the one highest appeal, that to the public at large, where is always in reserve a good measure of sympathy and sense…

Why seizures

In May, at a special session of the Superior Court, at Hartford, John Rogers is tried upon the following charges:— 1. For that in New London, in Feb. last, thou didst lay thy hand upon thy breast and say: This is the humane body of Christ, which words are presumptuous, absurd and of a blasphemous nature. 2. For saying, concerning a wheelbarrow thou broughtest into the meeting house about a…

The children

1684. A youth is growing up at Lyme, in regard to whom Matthew Griswold and his daughter Elizabeth may well feel some concern, although it afterwards appears that he is one of the brightest and manliest boys in the colony. This is none other than John Rogers, Jr. For five years past, his mother has been the wife of Peter Pratt, of Lyme, who has a son by this marriage.…

In this year occurs

Among noticeable young men in the Colony of Connecticut, previous to 1640, is James Rogers.[27] His name first appears on record at New Haven, but shortly after, in 1637, he is a soldier from Saybrook in the Pequot war.[28] He is next at Stratford, where he acquires considerable real estate and marries Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Rowland, a landed proprietor of that place, who eventually leaves a valuable estate to…

His first marriage

We had not intended to make further reply to Mr. McEwen’s Half-Century Sermon; but lest our silence should be construed by some as implying an inability to do so, we turn to it again. “The elder Gov. Griswold,” he says, “acted at one time as prosecuting attorney against the Rogerenes.” If this was so, he was prosecuting his somewhat near relatives, so far as the descendants of John Rogers, 2d,…