THE RUBY WINE

The fault is mine, for I knew, and Geraldine knew nothing. I knew the past. I knew of my sin. I knew, by some instinct, that God had brought the past to me. As a means of redeeming my crime He had imposed renunciation upon me as a penance, and I had chosen instead of renunciation this deathly masquerade. I would not be debased, I would not be humbled. God…

THE OLD OAK CHEST

I had such a strange dream. I dreamt that I was in man’s clothes, and that I was astride of a coal black horse: how I knew that the horse was black I scarcely can tell, for the night around me was dark as death, Geraldine was on the pommel before me, grasping me round the loins with her arms; her head was on my breast, the horse was galloping…

Miles and miles of park

The old clergyman who lives at Ashworth has just been. He comes twice a week and eats a biscuit and drinks a glass of wine, and tells me we should all think on the future life, or the life to come. He asked me what I was writing, and I said–nothing. Well–that day I had luncheon all alone. Where that other strange being had luncheon, or whether she had luncheon…

That made my eyes swim

And this was Geraldine Wilder, or Gerald–Geraldine Wilder, if you please. This half ghostly being, with brown rippling hair and a face like the face of a wild rose. And the dress of wonderful black lace that seemed draped round the slight figure by the fingers of the wind, and the milk white neck, rising like the stem of some graceful flower to support the small brown head, and the…

Then the old butler dropped the lamp

The footman got all my luggage together, and bought me a first-class ticket, and whilst he was getting me the ticket I went into the refreshment room and bought half a dozen packets of cigarettes and a little box of matches; smoking soothes my nerves. Then I walked to the B platform, if I remember right, where the Leeds express was standing, the footman following with my dressing bag. Gracious!…

Wilder

Then Wilder opened the hall door and I saw a splendid carriage and pair drawn up, the horses champing and flinging white foam about from their mouths. Wilder came down the steps and helped me in, the tall footman shut the door, and I heard Wilder’s voice saying to the coachman, “Coutts’.” Gracious! all the things I thought of as the carriage drove into Oxford Street. It was an open…

How this story is lengthening out

I had almost forgotten James Wilder’s existence, when, one night in June, I received an urgent message asking me to call upon him without delay. An hour later I was sitting in his library, and in the arm-chair opposite mine was sunk what seemed the spectre of my friend. During the ten months that had elapsed since our last meeting he had passed from middle life to premature old age.…

Is our universe so composed

I have cited this last only as a curiosity. For it has a strange history, and is not what it seems,–although the apparent motive was certainly suggested by some song like the one immediately preceding it. It is a song of loyalty, and was composed by Kido of Chō-shū, one of the leaders in that great movement which brought about the downfall of the Shōgunate, the restoration of the Imperial…

Jigoku

Outside of the city there is a still more famous Shintō temple, Sumiyoshi, dedicated to certain sea-gods who aided the Empress Jingō to conquer Korea. At Sumiyoshi there are pretty child-priestesses, and beautiful grounds, and an enormous pond spanned by a bridge so humped that, to cross it without taking off your shoes, you must cling to the parapet. At Sakai there is the Buddhist temple of Myōkokuji, in the…

Thereupon the Heavenly

Thus we reach the common truth recognized equally by Greek art and by Japanese art, namely, the non-moral significance of individual expression. And our admiration of the art reflecting personality is, of course, non-moral, since the delineation of individual imperfection is not, in the ethical sense, a subject for admiration. Although the facial aspects which really attract us may be considered the outward correlatives of inward perfections, or of approaches…