BACK TO THE BUFFALO RANGE

When the dusty bull train came rolling along the road past the garrison it found us waiting. Our property was stowed in an empty wagon, and, again shouting good-bys to the comrades who had come out to see us off, we began our tedious, dusty, dirty march with the bull train. At that time Majors & Russell, of Leavenworth, Kansas, had the contract for transporting government supplies to all frontier…

WE GET OUR DISCHARGES

“Well, men, what will we do?” said Jack Flanagan. “We can re-enlist or go back to the States and each hunt his job, or we can try to get something to do where we can all three stick together.” “Let’s stick together if we can,” said I. “Now, hold on, men,” advised Tom Vance, “until you hear what I have got to say. I have been thinking a lot about…

MOSTLY ABOUT FLOWERS

It was late when Leslie left the hotel. The moon was rising over Nagasaki, and he required no lamp to light him up the hill path leading to the house. In the veranda he sat down to rest a moment and pull off his boots. The landscape garden, looking very antique in the moonlight, lay before him, the moon lighting its tiny hills and melancholy groves with the same particular…

with a maddening husbandish air

January 12. We are all sleeping so badly. Even the Senator, whom nothing has ever before kept from his “proper rest,” is complaining of wakefulness. Suppers every night either here or elsewhere, the house never quiet until two or three in the morning, all of us up at eight–Cyrus often at seven because he rides a good deal, and the early morning is the only time when any one in…

Happy for the first time

November 29. At half-past one to-day–half-past one exactly–I began my “career.” Mrs. Carteret said she would call for me at five minutes to one. But it was ten minutes after when she appeared, away down at the corner of I Street. Jim was walking up and down the drawing-room; I was at the window, watching that corner of I Street. “There she blows!” I cried, my voice brave, but my…

From his grace

THE night of suspense—longer than a year of happiness—wore to an end, because all things end. At noon Lady Betty stood in Lady Russell’s drawing-room, leaning against the window and looking out, so wan and wasted that her hostess started at the sight of her as she entered. The two women greeted each other with an affection born of sympathy, in spite of their brief acquaintance, and as they stood…

THE KING

LADY BETTY’S weakness passed. She was too strong, too loving, and too determined by nature, to give way to the tears and sighs of a whining woman. So stern was her face and so resolute that even Alice, with all the old claims of faithful service and affection, dared not offer her any consolation save to kiss her hand humbly and sadly. “Ah, Alice,” she said, “I cannot talk to…

FATHER AND DAUGHTER

POOR Lady Betty, half distracted, fled from the house into Leicester Fields, trying to find the party that had preceded her with her husband as a prisoner. The darkness and the peril of the London streets at that late hour did not enter her thoughts. Bareheaded and without a cloak to shield her from the cold night air, she ran around the square. She saw lights in the adjacent houses,…

THE ARREST

MEANWHILE, Alice Lynn, with a pale face and watchful eyes, ran down the gallery that opened into Lady Clancarty’s private apartments; she locked the door at the upper end and thrust the key into her pocket; she ran back to the only other entrance, the door upon the staircase, and there she seated herself upon the upper step, a devoted sentinel, though her heart beat almost to suffocation. If Clancarty…

The foine lady

IT was a small and desolate room, with bare rafters overhead, and the wind rattling fiercely at the old casements, while Denis was trying to keep a sickly fire of green wood alive upon the hearth. The floor was of stone, cold and bare, save for a few rushes strewn beside the truckle bed, and there was no light but that from the sputtering logs and one poor taper; there…