You are listening to the cannon of the siege train

In this manner we all sat ruminating upon schemes of vengeance, when our little boy came running in to tell us that Mr. Burchell was approaching at the other end of the field. It is easier to conceive than describe the complicated sensations which we felt from the pain of a recent injury and the pleasure of approaching vengeance.—VICAR OF WAKEFIELD. It was fully three weeks after the affair of…

Now an armour-clad, of six-inch iron plate

BEN. This wind you talk of blows us from ourselves! Supper is done, and we shall come too late. ROMEO. I fear too early; for my mind misgives, Some consequence, yet hanging in the stars, Shall bitterly begin his fearful date With this night’s revels; and expire the term Of a despised life, closed in my breast, By some vile forfeit of untimely death: But he that hath the steerage…

His sentence had been read over

It was at length the same to me, Fettered or fetterless to be, I learned to love despair. And thus when they appeared at last, And all my bonds aside were cast, Those heavy walls to me had grown A heritage—and all my own! BYRON. Situated on a rocky slope, under the shadow of the hills of Karaba Yaila, stand the town and castle of Kourouk. Built by the Genoese…

The rising sun saw us once more on the road

Yes, thou art gone, sweet friend, my own, We miss thee every day, And I, yet more than all, alone, Can only weep and pray. Pray to be rendered meet for heaven, And agonize in prayer, That if we meet no more below, Our meeting may be there. The first halting-place of my escort was in a wood of wild pear trees, among some of those ancient burial mounds or…

Ere long we shall see what this availed him.

ALBANY. O save him! save him! GONERIL. This is mere practice, Gloster: By the law of arms, thou wast not bound to answer An unknown opposite; thou art not vanquished, But cozened and beguiled. SHAKSPEARE. The prayer of Hezekiah for the prolongation of life flashed on my memory, and rose to my lips, as with rage, and almost with despair at my heart, I struggled to my feet, half-stunned, and…

Proved in the under-written Odyssey

The letter from the Under Secretary of State for War, which announced my capture by the Russians, unfortunately proved more correct in its tenor than the telegram; but the mode in which I fell into their hands, through the foul treachery of Mr. De Warr Berkeley, shall be detailed by myself in the following chapter. On the 23rd of September, early in the morning, we bade adieu to the Alma,…

The mournful singing of the sea

A few days after the startling telegram reached Calderwood, the newspapers teemed with despatches and details of the victory at the Alma, the flight of the shattered Russian Army towards Baktchiserai, and the advance of the Allies on Sebastopol. Among those details were the official lists of the killed, wounded, and missing, furnished by the adjutant-general. How many a home in the British Isles did these fatal lists fill with…

In our hands it is no trifle!

The battle was fought and won; the thunder had died away along the heights of the Alma; it was all over now—that “hell of blood and ferocity” was past; and little more remained but to number the dead, and lay them in their last ghastly homes. The agonies even of the wounded—that terrible grey acre of Russian wounded—were half forgotten by the untouched; but many a bright-eyed girl in England…

Past, present, and to come;—but all may yield

At half-past one the British infantry advanced into action; like lightning the order flew along the line, for it was borne by Nolan, the impetuous and the gallant. The village of Burliuk, the centre of our position, was still in flames that rose to a vast height, especially from the well-filled stackyards. To the right of the conflagration, two regiments of Adams’s brigade, the Welsh[*] and 49th, or Hertfordshire, crossed…

Through each long line the curling volumes spread

After the troops crossed the Bulganak, strict silence was enjoined, and no drum was beaten or bugle blown. Scattered parties of Russian cavalry scoured all the ground before us; and as they galloped to and fro, the gleam of Cossack lances, the flash of a carbine, or the steady glitter of sword-blades and cuirasses, shone at times from among the groves of the turpentine trees, and between the rocky undulations…